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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I acquired an LD-28 crank from the junkyard today for $20.00 and about 5 hours labor pulling it! Unfortunately, while I had the flu last week, someone snagged the only 240 engine they had, from which I planned to get the connecting rods.
Anyway, as I don't plan on using this crank for 2 to 3 years, what is the best way to store it?
thanks in advance

mike golding
 

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> I acquired an LD-28 crank from the junkyard
> today for $20.00 and about 5 hours labor
> pulling it! Unfortunately, while I had the
> flu last week, someone snagged the only 240
> engine they had, from which I planned to get
> the connecting rods.
> Anyway, as I don't plan on using this crank
> for 2 to 3 years, what is the best way to
> store it?
> thanks in advance

> mike golding

mike,
your worst enemy as you know is rust. first, make sure it is covered in oil, then put it in plastic wrapping. I would also check on it periodically. if you can seal it up in a relativly dry environment,(in your house, not outside), and seal it up good, rust doesn't have much chance. you don't need to really worry about it bending, just store it on its side. i would also check with some local machine shops to see if they have some ideas.
-bob hanvey
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
> I acquired an LD-28 crank from the junkyard
> today for $20.00 and about 5 hours labor
> pulling it! Unfortunately, while I had the
> flu last week, someone snagged the only 240
> engine they had, from which I planned to get
> the connecting rods.
> Anyway, as I don't plan on using this crank
> for 2 to 3 years, what is the best way to
> store it?
> thanks in advance

> mike golding
Mike, we cosmoline them, and then store inside!!!
Check for rust once in a while, and you could easily clean it off if you stay on it. We cosmoline our driveline yokes, and leave them out
in the sunny Portland weather, HA HA, and they hold up great, even in the direct rain.
Joe
 

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Like other replies have said. I'd:

1) Clean it if required, but ONLY if it shows any sign of rust or water exposure. Don't bother if its' from a freshly retired engine with reasonable oil.

2) Remove any/all surface rust. Chemically treat any deeper rust (or throw it out).

3) Flush any moisture from the galleries & thread holes using compressed air and/or WD40.

4) Give it a good coating with grease or motor oil. Flush any galleries with motor oil.

5) Wrap metal in a clean oiled rag to both hold the lubricant and protect from scratches/dents.

6) Put the metal/cloth-wrap into a plastic bag and seal from air moisture.

Store out of condensing conditions if possible. Inspect occasionally.

Hint: Don't store metal engine parts (block, crank, etc.) on your cement garage floor because the concrete will suck the moisture out of the metal like a big sponge and leave it brittle an porous. It'll then absorb water from the air and develop surface rust (and worse).
 
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