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Hi,

I have just finished sandblasting and preping my rear suspension parts ... control arms, strut assemblies, etc.

What is a tough paint and primer to use on these parts? (ie. acrylic, etc...) How many coats do you recommend?
Drying time is not important to me.

Scott Thompson
 

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Get yourself an Eastwood catalog or visit them at www.eastwoodco.com they have all the neat stuff you always wondered if someone makes. They even have do it yourself powdercoat systems. If you don't see anything you want I would go with an etching primer and a good acrylic enamel.
Brett
 

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If you want an equivalent of "powdercoat in a can" try POR15. It is available at (www.por15.com). The quality is excellent and it brushes on. I have been using their products and LOVE them. It does take more attention for surface prep, though. The cost is much higher than normal paints, too. Drop me an email if you want more detail of my experiences.
 

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I'd recommend powdercoating...

I know powdercoating is more expensive, but since you are doing all of your suspension parts at the same time, they should be able to give you a better rate, especially since you are painting black, which is a very common, and cheap color.

For example, I called around local powdercoating shops and this is what I was quoted.
To powdercoat my valve cover black: ~$70
I could add all four brake calipers and some small brackets to that for no extra charge. Not too bad if you ask me, especially considering how durable powedercoating is.
 

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<b>Imron</b>

5 years old and it still looks like new and thats in the Arizona sun without waxing. It's kind of hard to work with and expensive but lasts forever.

Jared
 

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i read in a 4x4 magazine that car companies dip their suspension parts for good coverage and then drip dry often you can see the drip residuals, the magazine said get rustoleum brand in a gallon can,then get a container large enough to dip in add mostly water first till near the top then add about an inch or two of paint. this is a oil base paint (strong too) so it will float on the water .as you dip the preped part it will be coated in all the nooks and crannies thoroughlysince it is coated with paint as it passes into the water no harm done good way to not have to buy 10 gallons of paint to dip with. try it on some samples in a glass jar cool to watch ya know .i did and it seemed to work well . just tie the part with fishing line or use coat hangars to dip and hang with. consider this your martha stuart short cut,for decent quality-simplicity-and economy, besides how often do people admire the undercarriage and particulars on your car unless a show car?
 
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