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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
at around 2K RPMs I can hear a ticking sound from the engine I was told by a auto repair store that
it was the timing chain they said that I could not get a price until they started taking it apart so I told them to do nothing hopeing it was not that bad well now I have the car on the road and love it but the ticking sound is worse then I hoped so I took it to another shop and the guy said it was the timing chain gides and that they broke and thats letting the chain slap
well on to the question he said the labor would be $360 to put every thing that has to do with the chain in but the parts would be 170 just for the chain I told him that I would get the parts some where else

motorsport auto has the chain set for $94? I think
do you know if its good? also is $360 a good price?

It's a 81 280ZX Turbo

Thanks
 

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360 is way too much, call a couple more shops and find out how many hours the Labor Guide says the job will take. Most shops...depending where you live charge $40-$50 a hour for labor. I would get a second opinion, it's hard to break a guide. Maybe the chain is loose, bu there's an easy fix on the L series motor to take up the slack , the Cam Gear is slotted for the cam dowel in three places. All you have to do is pull the Valve cover, loosen, remove and turn the gear. It's set up to do that Twice! Be careful not to let the chain slack while you're doing it, or the tensioner can pop out and you will be tearing the front end down. (done that) Get a Haynes manual and try it. If it needs a timing set, I bought a Dynagear complete set with all timing components at Autozone fo like 60 bucks, and it was as quality as any I've seen.
 

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$360 isn't a bad deal. a labor estimate book will give about 6 to 8 hours to change a timing chain usually. if the chain is so stretched that the tensioner is out of travel, it will start to slap and beat up the guides. eventually the guides break and metal circulates through the oiling system. there are three notches on the cam gear but these have nothing to do with taking up slack in the chain. these are only for advancing the cam timing to compensate for a stretched chain. each notch advances the cam 4 degrees.

-casper
 

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Hay I have the samae sound and I know it not the timing chain. It is my manifold let it idel and feel around the manifold if u feel air u will have a leak.

Take it to a diffent macanic and have them look in to it.
 

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Re: you're wrong

Moving the gear does take slack out of the chain, you cant change valve timing unless you turn the cam. You might want to read up on it. I called a shop locally and he said the Labor guide showed 5.5 hours X 50 hour = 275, and I know someone will beat that..
 

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Re: I don't think so

> Moving the gear does take slack out of the
> chain, you cant change valve timing unless
> you turn the cam. You might want to read up
> on it. I called a shop locally and he said
> the Labor guide showed 5.5 hours X 50 hour =
> 275, and I know someone will beat that..

how could changing the position of the timing gear take slack out of the chain? think about it. to take the slack out of the chain you have to lengthen its routing. this can be done with a tensioner, or by increasing the distance between centerlines of the cam and crank such as with a head gasket shim or cam tower shims. changing positions of the cam gear only changes the degree relationship between the cam and crank, not the distance. as the timing chain wears, it gets longer. this creates slack. the slack is compensated for with the tensioner. but the other problem is the cam will also retard in relationship with the crank. nissan gives you the option of using two additional cam positions. these cam positions are 4 and 8 degrees advanced respectively. there is a slot on the cam retaining plate that represents 4 degrees of rotation. if the timing mark on the cam gear lines up on the late side of this slot, the chain has stretched over 4 degrees and you move it to the next position. then you check where the timing mark lines up again. if it falls withing this slot, you're okay. i think you should do some reading of your own, this is pretty basic stuff.

-casper
 

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Ummm...read this

I think you are saying the same thing, basically, except maybe using the wrong terminology. Casper is correct, you would have to lengthen the path of the chain to take up slack. With a stretched chain what happens is the cam becomes retarded, as casper said, and to account for that, you advance the cam using the holes. This does not mean the chain is any tighter, only that the timing of the cam to the crankshaft is in the correct position. Think about it this way, the one side of the chain is ALWAYS tight when running, so if the length is say 50 links long when new, and now 52 when worn, it is longer and thus the cam is not in the same position relative to the crank anymore. (i made the numbers up for illustration purposes only.) Does this make sense? The slack side still slaps around in the back if the tensioners are worn or can not put enough pressure on the chain, or what ever reason. Advice, change the chain and gears. It is not hard, just have to be a little careful and meticulous when putting the new one on. I used a Beck/Arnley from Pep Boys (like $75). They are made in japan to Nissan specs, or that is what they say. I have not had it but two months on my new engine, so i can not state that it lasts and different than the stock.
If you have anymore questions, ask, that is what this is here for, not argueing,
Joshua L.

This is why the adjustable cam gears for hondas are so popular, you can change the cam timing with respect to the crank, it changes the power band and moves it into different rpm ranges.
 

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Hmmm, I think that your right, I've had 13 Zcars and I've never had a timing chain go bad(as long as it was maintained well). If you hear ticking on your engine, chances are that it's your valve adjustment gone either loose or tight. When my engines start to go tight(from the valve seats starting to sink further into the head) I get that ticking sound. Check your valve clearances and I think that you will find them in that condition. Readjust them and be happy, as even with pulling the valve cover, you cannot determine how worn the guides are without a complete front engine teardown. Good Luck!
 
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