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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Simple question. I'd just like to hear the general consensus on wether to use hydraulic shocks/struts, or gas. From what I've been reading, the hydraulic will give a firmer more solid feel of the road, and the gas would be more comfort tuned.. then again.. I could be just high from inhaling the exhaust fumes that enter through my taillight gaskets. :)

Happy new year peoples! Be safe out there..
-il82
 

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Boiling

If you go over very bumpy ground, the hydraulic type loose their performance after constant use - the hydraulic fluid heats up, thus becoming less dense, and therefore offering less resistance to the piston, as so performing less.

Gas types come in nice inserts which can be readily adapted to your strut casing: unless you can get a self contained hydraulic insert, you will have trouble getting a good seal between the piston and the strut case. Gas is more modern, and should give you better performance. It is simple to adapt a gas insert to the strut case: They should come with gland nuts which have two important dimensions: The hole in the middle which allows the piston to protrude, and the outer thread to match your strut case. Any place that sells shock absorbers will have a good selection of these adapter gland nuts.

Hope your racing soon!
 

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Re: Boiling

Gas struts are still hydraulic but they are pressurised with
an inert gas to help stop foaming of the oil.This foaming will
change the way the oil is fed through the jet and makes the action softer.(which you don't want).Modern shocks are the gas pressurised type.
Cheers DavidU. (aust)
 

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Re: Doesn't matter

All the good performance shocks available for the Z are gas pressurized to some degree. Tokico, Koni (3012), Bilstien, KYB, etc. all have some level of gas pressurization.

- John
 

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Re: Doesn't matter

Okay, I forgot to mention DavidU's point that 'gas' struts are more properly termed more advanced oil types.

Because the strut is not entirely filled with hydraulic fluid, the remaining space is filled with presurised gas, normally nitrogen. This in turn pressurises the hydraulic, and as those of you who have done science will know, pressurised fluid maintains a higher density at temperature as compared to non-presurised, so it offers better resistance to the piston.

Buy gas!!!!!!!!
 
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