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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a dumb question. When you remove the original oil-filled strut from a 280Z and replace it with a modern gas strut, do you replace the 300ml of strut oil with new strut oil?

Second question (perhaps also dumb). Where does the McPherson Strut 'Bump Stop Bushing' go on the front suspension. I was able to find all my other bushing locations, but the Bump Stop elludes me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
<b>RE: Strut Oil with Gas Struts???</b>

Yes, you put the oil inside the tube then put the cartridge in. Make sure you clean the tube out first,and don't use Gabriel shocks,the gland nut is Alum.,it won't last.
Another thing, use a thread glue like"loctite" when you screw on the gland nut so it won't come off later down the road. How are your shock boots? you can go to Napa and buy them for the front,the back you'll have to get from the dealer,their costly.
Kip
 

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I just had my front and rear suspension re-done and did not fill the strut with oil, the bump stops are located on the upper spring seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, help me out here fellas...why would you put oil in a housing with a Gas cartridge? I have done alot of struts, and never heard that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<b>RE: Strut Oil with Gas Struts???</b>

Kip is correct that some aftermarket struts suggest leaving some oil in to help transfer heat from the new cartridge to the strut housing. Others such as KYB do not recommend it (at least on the model I recently used on the front of my '77 280 Z).

The bump stop is located below the upper spring retainer. The KYB dust boot I used to replace the disintegrated stock boot had the bump stop built in, so I did not have to replace it with a separate one.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i just did mine, and put em in dry, i'd bet the 3 oz oil they call for helps dissipate strut heat... my replacement gas charged cartridges took some time to install, but very worth the effort. I didn't have to open the hyd brake. I used pipe straps, 2, bolted, while' compressed to crunch/hold the spring, broke the old guts free using the tower center hole w/washers over the old rod nut. pry down on lower A arm after removing the 4 outer half shaft bolts. slipped the old guts out at the fender lip, cleared the oil out and put in new. Centered the new rod in the mounted tower, jacked the car to relieve strap tension, installed shaft and wheel
2 hrs each side (plus a 20 minute back road rip !!))
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 300cc (my 75 says 340) of oil is to refill the ORIGINAL struts that were not cartriges. The outer casing of the strut, i.e. the body of the strut, is actually the outer skin of the cartridge.If you tried to pull the cartidge out of an original strut, you'd pull out the piston, seals, and inner casing. They didn't have a removable cartridge from the factory, just the replacments. If you put in all the original oil, you'd overflow very fast when you put in a cartridge. I'm refilling a pair now actually to see how well they work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the input!!!

Thanks for all the input ... I have Tokico struts and I think I'll just put a little hydraulic oil (the kind that goes into hydraulic jacks) in the tube for cooling purposes.

Upgrading your suspension is REALLY a pain. I now see why my local mechanic wanted over $1,000 in labor to do what I'm doing.
 
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