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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seasons Greetings to All!!

I'm looking for a sandblaster for home use. There's a lot of crud on my 71 that I would like to clean off. I have a 6hp/30gal compressor that puts out 6.4cfm @90lbs. Does anyone have any recommendations or things that I should be aware of before buying? Is my compressor adequate for sandblasting?


Thanks

Chris
 

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Chris, your compressor will run some of the smaller canister and bucket type blasting kits BUT I wouldn't recommend them. I was in your exact situation several years ago and have owned bucket systems, pressurized canisters and such. My opinion is that they are not worth the space they take up in my garage. It takes a serious setup to do any real cleaning with a sandblaster. Seriously, I could just about do it as fast with a good DA sander.
That is my 2 cents. Put your money towards having a professional do it for you.

Have you tried steam cleaning? Not pressure washing but specifically steam. I used one to remove old cracked PAINT on my project car. It is a lot cleaner, too.

Craig
 

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Chris,

I have a 90lb capacity canister type I got from Habor Freight that I have used for years. When I started I had a 3hp compressor with a 20 gallon tank and an extra 30 gallon tank added to that (I now have a 6.5 with an 80 gallon tank). What I did was to add a regulator at the blaster inlet and then run my compressor regulator to where it would fill both tanks to 120psi.
The other thing I did was to build a home made blast cabinet. I looked at the units outfits like Eastwood had and patterned mine after theirs. I basically built a box with a front opening lid with a glass window in it. Then I had a sheetmetal shop cut me the pieces to make a pyrimid shaped hopper on the bottom that let my sand drop down into the 5 gallon bucket under the unit. I used my canister blaster hose feed through a hole in the side of the unit, rigged up an interior light, and a vacuum system to keep the dust down. The cabinet worked great an all for less than a 100 bucks. I have blasted hundreds of small parts over the years.

However, let me say that for big stuff, such as body panels, doors, hood, etc, I take mine to a pro who has really good equipment and uses milder abrasives than I have. He does a good job at a fair price and I figure that to have my hood, rear hatch, doors, fenders, gas tank, and several other parts taken down to bright, bare metal cost me about 250.00.

Hope this helps ya.................

Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guy's.............

My tank will handle 150 psi max, am I in the ballpark for a 50lb portable unit? I am just looking to clean the rust and gunk off strut tubes and other suspension parts. It sounds like taking the chrome off of some old wheels should go to a pro.

Where do you get a steam cleaner?


Chris
 

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It kinda depends on what you are looking for. I have a 5.5 hp compressor, and a $30 Home depot sand blaster. I use it outside. It's incredably handy for cleaning suspension parts and lots of other things, I'd be lost without it.
Silica sand is a couple bucks for a 50 lb bag, you can sweep it up, sift it and reuse it, or put it in your garden.
It does work the compressor pretty hard, a sander is sometimes faster, but not for curved surfaces.
 

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I've found for getting rid of rust, you almost need a sandblaster. Any little pit in the metal will get left by anything like sandpaper when the blaster will get it all. I agree with the others in saying it's best to take large projects to a professional. I've got one of the 50lb bucket units, and it works slowly, but does an ok job. I would never attempt anything like a body pannel with it, I'd be there all day doing a hood!

Dylan
 

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Hey Chrome,

The problem with using sand is that you have to have a really good face mask/filter unit otherwise you risk getting silicosis. That is a very nasty lung disease. Here in OKC I go to a supplier who for 6 bucks a 100lb bag sells me a blast media that is the by-product of the iron smelting industry. It is basically a slag product. It cuts way better than sand, can be run through a good half dozen times before it is too broken up to use, and has no health implications. In fact the bag even says you don't need to wear a filter (I do though, better safe than sorry in the long run).

Charles
 

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small...

MOst sandblasters use 14cfm with decent sized nozzles.
My suggestion would be to stick with a brand-mane that you can get parrts for: ALC Sandy-Jet for instance. I have a 100# hopper unit, and has worked great for years.
Next, find the SMALLEST air jet you can, and operate the unit at between 40-50psi. This will be enough to strip paint, and give you the most run-time on your small tank.
You really need a 5 to 6hp compressor with a 60 or 80 gallon tank to sandblast with any seriousness. The volume of the tank is what lets you run and run...
If you find a scrapped tank, you can double them up...
 

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BTW...

Everybody above posted excellent suggestions. I'd ESPECIALLY recommend a good respirator. I did the entire engine bay in my 73. I will never do it again! I got silicosis (my stupidity) and for what I accomplished, I could've chemical stripped the paint just as quickly---probably quicker, and then just sandblasted the cancerous areas.
That's what I do now. And I did get a small blast cabinet for the small parts, and use glass beads..
INtake manifolds work out well with 100 grit aluminum oxide---it really covers up small scratches, like from sanding off parting lines, etc etc.
I don't sandblast large areas anymore, I chemically strip them.
 
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