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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here replaced their own clutch?
How big of a job is it not having a lift?

If not, what is the typical cost of having
someone do it for you?

Thanks
 

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> Has anyone here replaced their own clutch?
> How big of a job is it not having a lift?

> If not, what is the typical cost of having
> someone do it for you?

> Thanks
hey Dave
yes i have replaced my own clutch ..it is not hard and it is alot cheaper..with older cars it is a lot beter to try to do as much of your own work as possible for the simple reason of expense and experience...( and it is annother reason to buy more tools !! more more more hehehe)a man can never have enough tools !
so if you need help( a walk through) with your clutch replacement icq me @ 11603581 or e mail me @ [email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
> Has anyone here replaced their own clutch?
> How big of a job is it not having a lift?

> If not, what is the typical cost of having
> someone do it for you?

> Thanks

Not to hard of a job. Most important tools are torque wrench, clutch alignment tool, and a swivel adapter with long extensions to get the top transmission bolts. A jack with wheels would help a lot too so that the weight of the tranny is on it and not the input shaft.
 

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My last clutch change took me and a friend 2.5 hours. Unbolt the driveshaft at the diff. Don't remove the driveshaft from the tranny or it will leak. Unbolt the tranny at the engine. Unbolt the starter. Place a jack under the engine. Unbolt the tranny crossmember. Lower the engine and tranny. Slide off the tranny from the engine and you have exposure to the clutch. Pretty easy job to do. It is always recommended to have your flywheel turned. You will need 2 long breaker bars for the flywheel bolts and a little engineering to remove them, not too bad.
 

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Make sure you have the car on jacks all the way arownd. That is the easiest way, whole car about 15-18 off the ground in a level place (like driveway or carport). Unbolt all the bolts you can reach, lower the bell housing and then you can get to the upper bolts easier. Then raise the tranny back level and slide outward. change clutch and resurface flywheel, slide back on and bolt all the bolts on the bottom of the bell housing, lower the housing a little to get to the upper bolts and bolt on. With Murphy's Law, gathering all the parts and including the learning curve of this being your first one expect it to take 6 hours, that includes the time to have the flywheel turned.

LuZZifer,
Greenville, SC
'83 turbo project
'87 turbo

> Not to hard of a job. Most important tools
> are torque wrench, clutch alignment tool,
> and a swivel adapter with long extensions to
> get the top transmission bolts. A jack with
> wheels would help a lot too so that the
> weight of the tranny is on it and not the
> input shaft.
 
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