ZCar Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone had the fun experience of replacing rear wheel bearings? I've noticed a progressively louder rumble coming from the passenger side rear of Zack. Frequency changes with speed. I'm beginning to run out of radio to drown it out. Anything I should be particularly careful of?
Phantom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107,695 Posts
<b>RE: Rear Wheel Bearings</b>

I think I've got the same problem with my '80 280ZX--someone please help! But before I begin work on the wheel bearing, how do I determine if that is, in fact, the problem (i.e. differential, etc...)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107,695 Posts
<b>RE: Rear Wheel Bearings</b>

if you're having trouble determining where the noise is coming from, jack the car up and run the rear wheels in the air. you'll be able to tell whether it's the stub axle bearings or not, just put your ear next to it. i've changed these before, and they don't come apart easy. the fastest and easiest way i've found is with a big slide hammer and a cutting torch. you'll need to burn out the inside race of the inner bearing, then use the slide hammer to pull it out. you want to be careful not to cut into the spacer between the two bearings, as this needs to be saved. the only other method i've heard of is to remove the entire control arm and mount it in a press. if you don't have a torch, this would be the alternative. just have a machine shop press the bearings for you.

-casper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107,695 Posts
Just did this, need...

Casper wrote:
the fastest and easiest way i've found is with a big slide hammer and a cutting torch. you'll need to burn out the inside race of the inner bearing, then use the slide hammer to pull it out. you want to be careful not to cut into the spacer between the two bearings, as this needs to be saved. the only other method i've heard of is to remove the entire control arm and mount it in a press. if you don't have a torch, this would be the alternative. just have a machine shop press the bearings for you.

-casper

Get the big slide hammer and start pounding. My noise was in the Ujoints on the axle half-shaft. It was a clicking/grinding noise, especially when pulling from a stop uphill. Replaced the U-joints.

I changed the bearings while I had it on jack stands and the halfshafts off. With 200,000+ miles on the bearings, I though changing them was a safe bet. I didn't have to use a torch, though, just bang em out, bang em in. I also didn't have to worry about the spacer, as this just came out.

If you aren't replacing the U-joints, then just remove the four bolts holding the half shaft to the stub assembly and swing aside. Then get a HUGE breaker bar and 27mm socket to remove the stub axle bearing nut. After that's off, the use the slide hammer (attached to the wheel mounting studs) to bang out the stub and outer bearing.

The hardest part was putting the stub axle bearing nut back on. The stub has two sides flatted, and the stub axle bearing nut is locked not with a cotter pin but by flatting two sides of the nut to match the stub. This makes it a stubborn nut to turn in any direction once its on the stub. Because of space limitations, I could only get about 2 clicks on my ratchet per turn, so it was REALLY slow and took lots of force just to get those two clicks. I bought an air ratchet for my compressor and Viola! The nut went on quick. I still had to tighten by hand to the 180-220 ft/lbs of torque required. I wouldn't worry too much about checking the wheel for the requisite
rolling resistance, just tighten the @#$%^ out of the nut and keep turning until the flat sides of the nut match the flat sides of the stub axle. If you just keep turning until it gets REALLY hard, it's sure to be the same position as it was before removal.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107,695 Posts
My how to: Rear Wheel Bearings (long)

I have done this twice now on early 240's. It is quite an effort - thank goodness it doesn't have to be done often. Because it is as much effort as it is, I only use redline grease in there (oh ****, this is probably going to start up a new thread on synthetics vs dino-based lubes!!)

I know that this is not going to be popular, but I would not try this on the car! I think that it is too easy to brinell the new bearings if you do not make the effort & get the strut assy onto a hydraulic press & use proper tools to press on the appropriate race. Don't force things when using a press - too easy to screw up parts & have to go junk-yarding when you bend **** w/ that 20 tons of force...been there, done that.

Dissassembly works well with a slide hammer after removing the spindle nut.

Make sure you do not mix up the RH & LH spacer tubes, 'cause they may be different (A, B & C lenghts.) If you do, it is stamped on the tube and on the strut housing.

Pulling the inner race off of the outer bearing (the one on the spindle) is a real bear. Us a bearing splitter (I think that is what the darned tool is called.) I got mine (KD tools brand) from my local "tool town" kind'a place. That & the press & I got the bearing off w/ no heat added. Take care if you use heat, don't want to harden or temper or heat stress the spindle - they have been known to break when driving!

Just used a long punch to drive out the inner bearing from the strut housing.


Assembly. I turned some tools on the lathe to do this correctly (pressing only on the inner or outer race of the bearing not on the 'wrong' race & transferring the load through the balls - this will trash a bearing for sure.)

Pack your new bearings good - you'll never see them again until they are trash and you are enjoying this job again!

Press the outer bearing onto the spindle by pressing on the inner race.

Clean up the surfaces inside the strut housing so that the new bearings are going into/onto nice clean metal. One of the cars I did had some rust where the outer races were on the housing bore.

Press the inner bearing into the housing by pressing on the outer race.

Put the spacer tube onto the spindle set this into the housing & make sure that everything is located properly & happy. Support the wheel side of the spindle on something so you don't press on the lug bolts. Use a tube to press upon the inner race of the inner bearing & shove all this crud together.

Inner seal, washer, spindle nut torque, in the car & smile at how much quieter the ride is!

Order & such may not be perfect, over a year ago that I last did this & I'm at work w/o my manual...supposed to be designing machines of another type....

Hope this helps, gotta run

tomh

ps - good time to retrofit rear drums to zx disks while spindle is out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Guys

Great info and you've convinced me. The car goes over to jerry at All Z CAr Specialist. He has the tools, al the parts, and the experience. Now I know why he wants $65/side in labor. Sounds like a bargain to me.
Phantom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
40,975 Posts
another corvair tip?

on the corvairs, a popular tip was to put a grease zerk into the top of the bearing housing and a drain plug at the bottom. that way you could flush the grease at regular intervals. it also really quieted down the axle bearings since you never seemed to put enough in when you packed them anyway--anyone ever do this to a Z?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top