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Just cleaned all the F.I. connectors with electrical cleaner. A few days ago someone suggested using dielectric grease on the connectors. I am pretty sure that dielectric grease is non conductive but I would like to hear it from someone else. I don't want to short out the sensors. Thanks. John
 

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What it's for

I quote from the back of the tube of Dielectric Silicon Compound for Electronic Ignitions: "Recommended for all electrical and electronic ignition connections where a dielectric compound is required to prevent voltage loss from arcing, suppress radio frequency interference, dissipate heat, insulate connections, and seal out moisture." Specifies you can use it on marine light sockets, even. Sounds OK to me!! In fact, I think you have done well, Grasshopper.
 

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Re: What it's for

Sorry to differ, but from the tube's definition, it's saying that it ' insulates' and prevents voltage loss from arcing. That means it doesn't carry electricity at all.

Dielectric grease should only be used to cover the 'outside' of connectors that are already conducting, to protect them. Using it as a lube between connectors is asking for trouble.

Bryan
 

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Re: What it's for

I thought it was used to improve connections myself, but now Im not sure, It was sold to me to be applyed to a hollow area after the connection was made.
I think bryn is correct.
I now have to go and clean out the connecters I squeezed it into yesterday.
:(
Terry
 

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Re: What it's for

Beg to differ, but dielectric grease is a Z's best friend.
Been using it for years. Inside injector-sensors connectors, battery terminals,
fuses, clips, spade connectors, etc. After you've cleaned the connectors, squeeze
it into the connectors etc. Helps promote electrical flow and fights off corrosion.
Best stuff, stop that deadly greenish/whiteish corrosion that builds up after time.
I even put in into the connectors on my new motorcycle as it is exposed to the elements.Its mainly for the connectors, not for use inside afms, distributors etc.
When I drive my Z I have complete confidence in the electrical connections.
Ron
 

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Wait a CP minute...

I, too fell into the "put Die-electric grease everywhere, on every connection" edict. But Webster defines "dieelectric" as something that DOES NOT conduct electricity or prevents conductivity. Why would you want that in your contacts? I can understand it's use AROUND things like SP boots and on coil screws AFTER they have been cleaned and tightened, but how would it help ON contacts, and inevitably, between them, impeding conductivity?

I am a buliding contractor, and some of you might be familiar with the product that is applied on aluminum-to-copper connections that improves conductivity and prevents oxidation and arcing. It goes by a virety of trade names, like Oxy-Gard etc. Has anybody tried this stuff in an automotive application? I have not tried it, but am tempted...

steve 77
 

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Re: Wait a CP minute...

I used Oxy-gard on my connections. I assumed it was the same as dielectric grease. No complaints yet. However, I was confused as well, knowing that this was aninsulator. My guess ius thaty it insulates, but the connector makes a physical conection that the grease does not affect.
 

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Re: Wait a CP minute...

I'm suprised there is so much debate about this subject.

Here is the scoop. The grease is non-conductive. It is meant to be applied liberally to the actual connections. It does not prevent the connection from being made. Since it is a grease, it moves out of the way of a solid object. If your connections touched before, they will touch again. The grease ends up filling the voids around the connection. This keeps out water and air, and inhibits arcing and corrosion.

By not applying the grease to the actual connections, you are just wasting your grease and your time. Your connections will still corrode. I hate to disagree with Bryan, but in this case he is quite wrong.
 

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3 ancestors deep in electrical engineering

However I am not, but my father and his father and blah blah were electrical engineers. Grandfathers were automotive, my dad is commercial. From what I have learned from them Dielectric grease is to be used as Zuber and others have stated - on the connections. Your connections are supposed to make good contact if they can't make it through a grease film then you need to replace the connection. Even in bullet connectors, spades whatever there are gaps between the contacts - you want the grease to take up the space in these voids. If not the electricity arcs and cause interference or noise. You also want it in your connectors to isolate each circuit from the other, for instance the connectors for the combination switchs where that hot headlight power wire comes in full voltage right next to a wire with half the voltage and amperage - there is measurable noise and energy bleed between these wires dielectic grease helps eliminate this by filling the electricity conducting air gaps.

I mean really putting it on the outside of the connectors is protecting what? The plastic housing from corrosion! I put it in the connections and lightly in the back side of the connectors where the wires go in.

Matt
 
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