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Discussion Starter #1
I just redone my interior but some of the paint is flaking off. It only wants to stay on my dashboard. Is there a overcoat I should have used? Or do you recommend an overcoat like a clear coat or something. Any advice would help.
 

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the main problem with repainting the interior is to use the right paint for the material you are painting. next all the surfaces must be really really clean, their are several cleaner and prep solvent they make for this. dupont is the one that comes to mind but im sure ppg and ditzler make something as well. go to a autobody and paint supply for these items. good luck keep zn
 

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What you need to apply before you paint is an adhesion promoter. SEM products sells one called Bulldog adhesion promoter, I've even seen this product available at Autozone. A paint and body suppy store will have the promoter as well as the vintl paint or you can checkout http://www.eastwoodco.com/, they also sell such products.
 

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Jet-Sorry man, if the paint's flaking off, you have a problem that won't be solved by adding more paint. Like the other fellas have posted, the trick with painting interior parts is in the prep. You must have clean parts, all oxidation and contaminants must be removed with cleaners, the parts then preped and finally, painted. Many of us have used the SEM line of paints and preps with excellent luck.
If the new paint's coming off, you'll need to remove the paint and start over.
Sorry, Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #5
F%$#! oh well, guess
i have somethin to do this weekend. At least I only painted the dash/console....

thanks for the help
 

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Paint requires either a "live" prior coat (one that hasn't cured completely, i.e. within 20-30 minutes of prior shoot) or a surface that's been sanded to accept the paint. These are called chemical or mechanical adhesion.

Since mechanical adhesion, (i.e. sanding and scuffing your surface) especially on the interior of the vehicle can be not only tedious but also incredibly difficult to do, due to the many surface changes, seams, and other irregularities, painters will usually use a "livening" or "activator" on the prior paint. This agent will essentially soften the paint so that the new coat can "melt" into the old coat and adhere properly. This now changes to being chemical adhesion.

Sometimes called adhesion promoters, or sanding eliminators, they are typically a high grade of fast flash reducer. Another one to look for is called "Jamb-It". As the name implies, when painting door jambs, hood and trunk jambs, this product softens the prior coat and allows the new one to stick.

Please note that for proper paint adhesion, regardless of whether chemical or mechanical, you need to have a CLEAN surface. I personally like to wash the car with soap and water, then after drying the piece, attack it with Ditzler Wax and Grease Remover. If you want to save a few bucks, go ahead and use Mineral Spirits (commonly known as house paint thinner), but I would recommend the Ditzler as the chances of a reaction with your paint are minimal. AFTER cleaning, then I proceed to prepare for either the mechanical, (sanding) or chemical (shooting Jamb-It).

By the way, even though you might be painting onto a sanded surface, it's not a bad idea to use the W&G remover before painting whether primer or paint. The W&G will get rid of any oils from your hands, or whatever may have gotten on the surface. DO NOT do that after you've sprayed Jamb-It. Essentially after spraying Jamb-It you have "wet" paint.

Hope this helps.
 

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yea adhesion promoter

foul smelling crap too! wear a respirator!
got enough cancer patients in the hospitals
 

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Re: Painted my interior 1st remove old paint

that is flaking off. Then wipe down the plastic several time with laquer thinner to "rough up" the surface as others have suggested.

Then use SEM brand vinyl paint. VERY LIGHT COATS EACH PASS! Wait just a few mins between coats.

Their Satin Black is dead-on for a black int of a Z, while their NAPA Red is great for a red interior Z.
 

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Re: Lacquer Thinner on Plastic=====CAUTION!!!

Skip's comment is right on the target, but just be aware of what he means by "rough up" the surface of the plastic with Thinner.

The lacquer thinner will actually soften / dissolve the uppermost layer of plastic / vinyl, and by doing so will provide a clean virgin surface for paint to adhere to. However, if you take too long or use too much thinner, you may actually deform the plastic you are intending to paint.

The key word here is to wipe it down lightly, and use quick passes, you will get the feel for how clean you need and how fast the thinner is softening the plastic. Remember, you don't want to emboss your plastic pieces with the design of your rag instead of the original pattern.

By the way, be VERY careful when handling the piece immediately after wiping it down with thinner. If it hasn't had a chance to evaporate yet, you might imbed your fingerprint into the surface. Kind of cool for positive ownership ID, but looks tacky.
 
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