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Hmmm The Uninformed quickly respond?

If it's B.S. why do they put capacitors into the system of an amplifier?

It's a proven fact that stable voltages will help with ECU performance, and even running ground cables to assist in the electron flow will pay dividends ESPECIALLY on EFI powered cars. The more complex the EFI system, the more it will benefit from CLEAN POWER.

That being said, this is probably simply a large capacitor bank to stabilize voltage. It's not the same as the "power filters" available for individual circuits----so it's not a substitute for installing those individually.

What this is for is people with large impulse devices, so the instantaneous drain on the battery doesn't cause such a voltage drop that it affects the sensors and makes the ECU give you a bad decision regarding spark position or fueling.

You should see what a rough idle you can induce on an EFI car by simply turning on an ELECTRIC FAN that isn't properly filtered!

Trust me, it may seem like smoke and mirros or B.S., but noise in an electrical system that operates below 5VDC, and in many cases makes decisions based on board voltages in the MILLIVOLT range, a spike or dip can cause a big difference in the way a car performs.

Anything you can do to stabilize voltage to a true 13.8VDC under all conditions is to your benefit!
 

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it's like 100 octane fuel...

it's bs.
if your car is in good shape, you do not need it.

if your charging system is crap or your battery is under rated, why not just fix your car instead of buying a band-aid device? our efi systems on 75-83 cars are flint simple. same with the ignition systems.

it's like running 100 octane fuel, it's not useful for stock running.
 

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Rolls Eyes

READ the posts, dude:
"The more complex ECU you have in the car, the more important clean power becomes"

Some people DO have Z31 ECU's in S30's, and I will tell you FIRSTHAND, a Z31 ECU WILL be affected by the aforementioned electric fan!
 

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our EFI cars

READ the posts, dude:
"Is this BS or a benefit to our EFI cars."

the answer is simply no since the context was concerning our efi cars from 75-83 and they are flint simple and would not benefit. that's why i said "it's not useful for stock running".
 

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Yeah...

I'll remove that ground kit from the 81 and watch it start misfiring....

Yes, even on our stone age cars, if you have electrical impulses (thumping stereo mostly, high wattage lights also come to mind), during the voltage excursions, it can and will effect how the ECU controls the engine, and therefore be detrimental to how the car runs.

Voltage Stabilization on the front end has only recently become recognized outside the electronics industry as beneficial.

Most cro-magnons also had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the world of dyno proven ground kits making for smoother running, and less misfires.

Sorry, on this one, it's beneficial, but a power filter on the supply voltage would be cheaper and more effective IMO.
 

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yep.

absolutely, good point.
the more you change from the stock configuration (big amps, neon lights, etc), then you're taxing the design limits.
 

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Cheap and Good...

They rarely come cheap and good, but JeffP turned me on to the 20Amp power line filter sold at Radio Shack.
When I put an O-Scope on the power lines to my Megasquirt, the level of filtration for CHEAP was amazing. As long as you have a device that uses less than 20Amps, this is a good choice.
If you have more than that kind of load, then you are probably going to have to build your own. if you take the cover off the Radio Shack unit you find some deent sized capacitory and a filter coil (whatever you want to call it) really smoothes out spikes, and the capacitors help with the instaneous dips.

I put one on my MS, and noticed all my inputs settled down---less little corrective movements. Very steady needles on the "gauges" and better datalogs with more data within say, a 3 sigma limit form normal or what you would expect to see as normal. You could see on the datalogs before when the input voltage would go up or down, ALL the sensor readings went up and down at the same time, or at a lag that was tracable when you graphed it.
 

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Looks like the actual product itself is BS (I'm not saying if it works or not, just the fact they call it a NISMO product).
If you look at all their other items for sale, it looks like they've just slapped stickers on the parts, and they aren't actually genuine parts...
 

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Crap Tony, I forgot about that filter. I wonder how well it would filter my electric cooling fan. If I still have one, I will have to check.

The filtering of the noise as it is called is important. I dont know about that part because they don't tell you what it is, but there is more to contend with then just noise, dips in the voltage of the battery for one caused by a big amp. The battery CANT react that fast to keep a constant voltage and current requirement of a large amp. A (BFC) BIG Capacitor, in the range of 1 Farad, will make up for the dips in voltage. Then you have another (BFC), UH Big Choke, or coil that takes away voltage spikes in the system created by some device like an electric motor. Then you have various stubber circuits that basically clamp a spike at a specific frequency. Oh and BTW that is one reason an alternator is VERY difficult to filter, as the engine RPM increases and decreases the frequency of the spike changes, now aint that a fun one to fix.
So in a nut shell, a CAPACITOR, INDUCTOR, and FREQUENCY specific filter are ALL used in an automotive ECU, ALL OF THEM! The degree of effectiveness varies. So unless you can totally isolate the ECU from all of the rest of the electrical devices in a car, you will face these problems. Fortunately for most, the auto manufacturer does all of this work for you.
 

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Oh, I still remembered it right...

I was going to call the coil an "Inductive Coil" as that's the typ of load it (uh....) "Induces" into a circuit.

I didn't forget all those basic electrical CF classes.
 
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