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Hey all,

At the point of what is becoming a mega-buck restoration of my 76 that the brand spanking new windshield is going in. Now, when I installed the rear hatch glass I waited till the glass was in and bedded with 3M glass adhesive/sealant until I put the SS trim back in. What a bear of a job!! After I finally wrestled it into place I checked the archives and noted that one person who wrote about trim installation says that it should be put onto the rubber seal before the glass is set into the car.

Now, two questions: 1. Is this the correct way to do it, and 2, doesn't that make it harder to get the noozzle of the adhesive under the edge of the glass??

Thanks guys

Charles
 

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I hope I'm not the only one to answer you, since the last time I did a windshield or rear glass was over 10 years ago.

I do recall that installing the chrome trim was tricky but not impossible, and yes I installed it AFTER the window was in.

First of all, are you using NEW rubber gasket or are you trying to reuse the old one? If new, then it should already be quite pliable and simple manipulation will work it into the metal seam and then the glass can be fitted into it. If working with an old piece of rubber, I would STRONGLY recommend seeing if you can afford a new gasket, the problems with reusing an old gasket can be more than the savings. But if your budget simply will not allow for a new gasket, then do the following. By the way other than the prep work for an old gasket, the steps are the same for a new gasket.

First, make sure ALL of the old sealant or adhesive is removed from the gasket EVERYWHERE. Check both the glass groove and the metal groove. Once you are sure that it is clean of adhesive, then using either mineral spirits or lacquer thinner on a rag, wipe down the whole rubber piece. This will help to "rejuvenate" it for a while, and will also help remove the black carbon rub off that is inevitable. Once youve done this, you're ready to work with it.

Next step is to immerse it in a tub of HOT water, the hotter the better. Let it soak for 15 mins or so, the intent is to get it really soft and pliable. (By the way this isn't a bad tip even with NEW rubber).

While the rubber is heating up, make sure that the opening in the car is also clean of adhesive / sealant. In fact the opening should have been ready to accept the window / gasket before you started with the window. (I mean like paint, welding, etc etc.)

Once the rubber is hot, working quickly now, using a pre-mixed mixture of dishwashing liquid soap and water, coat the gasket somewhat liberally, then install the gasket into position on the car. Make sure you align molded in corners and bends into the right areas of the opening. (the rubber is going to start cooling down REAL quick now, so don't hesitate) Place the window pane directly over the opening, and if possible insert the lower portion of the glass or the upper, whichever edge is going to be furthest from you and therefore hardest to work with, INTO the gasket.

Now, with a teflon knife, available at most paint stores or glass shops, (it's a white plastic flexible knife, Eastwood sells one, but if you go to any auto glass shop, or paint shop you should find it either free or cheap), begin easing the rest of the glass into the gasket. Working somewhat quickly but carefully, as you insert more and more of the glass into the gasket, apply gentle, and the key work here is GENTLE pressure on the glass to help push it into the gasket. Work your way around the pane and at some point you should be able to feel the glass begin to be sucked into the gasket. Be careful at this point, because it's easy to rush through the rest of it and you'll end up marring or tearing the gasket, both no-no's. In fact, if you have a buddy available, have him exert GENTLE pressure BACK UP on the glass so that you don't pinch the gasket.

Once you've fitted the glass in, go around all edges to make sure that it is indeed seated well, and no wrinkles or pinches appear. The rubber should still be somewhat warm (luke warm maybe, maybe not) but the key is that you can still pull / knead the rubber into position. Once you're satisfied, go ahead and rinse off the dishwashing liquid. The cool water will help cool and contract the rubber around the window pane.

Run water around the new pane and gasket and check for water leaks, if you still have some, try to work the rubber into place first as this is the most common problen with a leaky glass pane.
If you have no leaks, excellent, go on to window trim.

If you have leaks and no amount of pulling pushing etc will get the rubber to sit in better, (this is why you don't really want to reuse your old gasket, it's not as pliable and will resist seating itself into it's groove) then locate the leak, and use a good quality SILICONE.
I recommend Aquarium Sealant since it has the least amount of nasties and seems to hold the best.

DO NOT USE CAULK OR RTV Silicone.

The trick to doing this right is to use a very small hole in the tip of the applicator, and again with the teflon knife, open the area where you need to insert silicone and get that tip in as far as it will go, then only use what you absolutely have to.


Now to install the window trim.

It typically arrives in sections, I recommend the soapy water trick again. Then being careful, slide the STRAIGHT pieces into the rubber with firm but gentle pressure. You're not SHOVING it in, you're gently easing it through the groove into position. Remember, if you bend these, the bend WILL SHOW. If you encounter any resistance, check first and see what's holding it up, usually it's a slight imperfection in the channel it rides in, and your teflon knife will help it past that point.

Once you have all the straight pieces, you should be able to fit in the curved or corner pieces. I found it easier to insert the INSIDE CURVE first, and then ease the rubber up and over the outside. Don't try to slide these in, you'll just mar up the gasket, or worse, cut the channel.

When you get done, you'll have a nicely done job.

By the way, the reason you do NOT want to install the trim before you install the glass into the car, is that it acts as a spreader / stiffener for the gasket.

Hope this helps, sorry for the length
E Scanlon
 
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