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Discussion Starter #1
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you guys heard this question before, however I am disabled and had to be dealing with cancer and other diseases, so my Datsun was garaged for almost 6 years, I changed the fuel line that goes from the tank to the Holley fuel pump as it had holes everywhere , the car started and I honestly didn’t know that the fuel goes bad after a while, I drained all the fuel out of the tank and it wasn’t that bad as other in the web, I also changed the fuel filters and the canister fuel filter as well. I want to work on my car so I tried to removed the tank and it’s kinda difficult for me, is there any chance that I could wash the fuel tank without removing it? I heard that vinegar is good for it, it could be any type of vinegar or has to be apple vinegar? Or any steps to use any cleaners? Thanks
 

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TBH the tank needs to be professionally cleaned/boiled or you're going to keep having the same problem. Maybe someone can help you get it out or drive it to a shop with your new fuel filters installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks a lot. Well looks like I might need to bring one of those mechanics on wheels, hope they don’t charge that much in removing it and putting it back.
 

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My vote is no. You can’t properly clean the tank in the car. You need to acid wash the inside and that means you need to get the acid everyone. You then need to to rinse, inspect and then re-coat the inside which requires removal. I did the job my self and I’d say it was hard but not that bad. Hardest part is probably disconnecting the the fuel filler tube connection. You need to find a buddy to help you. Buy the guy a dinner or give him a case of good beer, to get those hoses off for you.



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Not sure why you had such a tough time doing it - it literally takes MAYBE an hour. Just follow this video:
OK, removing it wasn't so difficult, nor was replacing the sender, but putting the **** thing back in by myself (and no handy lift) was tough. Let's see: slowly juggle the tank as you raise it, get the vent hoses thru the body and attached and tucked around without kinking, get the filler hose in place while squeezing my hand thru the narrow gap (and sharp fender edge) and tighten the clamp, then pull the straps underneath and lift the tank even higher while trying to fit the ends over the j-hooks with flat washers and lock washers and nuts, and finish it off with the supply and return hoses, and the sender wiring. Nothing to it, right?
 

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I paid around $350 at a place in Memphis. It looks like new now. I was in pretty bad shape. .



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Really nice!

The tank for my '71 was in "fairly decent" shape, so I sprayed carb cleaner inside to soften things up, then dragged it to the local pressure wash and managed to get most of the varnish out. Is it perfect? No, but better than it was. I'm willing to bet the tank in my '98 Tacoma looks worse. For the vent hoses, take a look at this page on my site Ace's Tips & Tricks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you guys, my friend’s friend came to visit and he helped me getting the tank down, I took it to a radiator shop and they powdered coated and I was charged $250 for the job. Now I am taking down my exhaust so I can clean it. I was planning on taking it to a friend of mine and chrome it. But I am hesitating on do in it as I was told that it causes higher temperatures on the whole exhaust system.
 

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For less than the cost of chrome, and more durable as well, if the tubing is in good shape, have it sand blasted and Alumina-Ceramic coated. It will resist rust better than chrome and last longer. But if it not sand blasted well, the rust will return from under the coating.
 

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I’d pull it and have it relined.
That way you can replace the old vacuum lines so you car don’t smell like fuel driving down the road with your windows open on a nice day.
R&R is fairly straight forward,
The boots on the wires to the sender get hard overtime but you can easily replace the terminals while you have the tank out.
 
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