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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm new to 240zs, so be gentle.
When I was replacing the Diff, I noticed the sway bar link had broken through the lower control arm attachment point. I first thought I could weld it up in place, but decided it would be easier to just get a used lower control arm and install it.
I'm stuck at the point of removing the lock "bolt" from the lower control arm which secures the travsverse link pivot bolt. As shown in Haynes page 180, it says to remove the "bolt". Both sides of my rear suspension have threaded studs from above and nuts from befow. I tried double nutting the stud, light taps with a hammer, heating with the torch, but have not tried vice grips yet. The "bolt" I am referring to is labelled #1 in diagram Fig. 11.29 as shown on the attached. Can you help me!
Scott in CA
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serch this forum for "spindle pin" and you will find lots of posts about them. They can be extremely hard to get out
 

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8 / 71 240Z, HLS30-40031, L24-052899, Sunshine Yellow
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That lock bolt is a round shaft with a tapered flat spot on one side. It mates with a flat spot on the transverse link and wedges the two together. The more you tighten the nut, the more it pulls the tapers tight. The best method I have found is to loosen the nut a couple turns. Then using a drift on the nut, or a second hammer as a drift and drive it strait up. That is not a great method and usually damages the lock bolt, which I couldn’t find at Rock Auto.
“English Racer” bicycles used to use a tapered pin like that on the pedal arms.
Hopefully someone has a better method.
 

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8 / 71 240Z, HLS30-40031, L24-052899, Sunshine Yellow
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I almost got the impression that your lock bolt has a threaded area on the top side. If that is the case, putting a nut on that and tightening it would pull the tapered pin out. I don’t remember seeing one like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The lock bolt came out easily, but not the transverse link. Does anyone know what the nut specifications are of the nuts on the end of the link? I am going to try the air ratchet idea. If that does not work, I will cut the link and take the lower control arm out to due additional de- construction. Thanks for all the help. I had not idea I was going into the quicksand!!!!.
cheers, Scott in CA.
 

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you should plan on buying new spindle pins, often the threads do no to well in the removal process. they tend to get stuck due to corrosion but also deforming the pin in the middle from the lock pin is common.

You can also try large washers stacked on the end such that you use the pin threads like a puller (pull thru the large opening created by the use of large washers). Its also tough on the threads likely to damage them as well, but generally you can get the spindle pin out. I would guess a impact hammer on the end of the pin (with a nut on it to prevent mushrooming the end of the threads) would be something worth trying as well.
 

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I'm doing to order the tool from Zcardepot.....looks easy on the youtube!
I bought their earlier version. When I used it the first time, they pulled right out. By "they" I mean the threads in the lug nut they used to attach to the spindle pin. The spindle pin stayed in place. Of course, it looked easy in their demo video.

I suggest two things.
1. Get an M8x1.25 die to chase the threads on the spindle pin. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09FL17V69 with a die handle https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000DD5U3)
2. Soak the **** thing as much as you can in penetrating fluid. Kroil is one of the best for this. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036RNKCO)
3. Have a mapp gas torch on hand, and at the first resistance of the pins use the torch until you think you're about to liquify the control arm.

Also, if you have an air hammer/chisel available, consider getting a flat hammer attachment if you don't already have one. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07G55KHWC)
 

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I spin the spindle pins with my impact wrench, then use a slide hammer....the free rental slide hammer from autozone. it's still a struggle...you have to keep switching from one tool to the other.
Part of the struggle come not from corrosion, but from galling around the slot in the pin where the wedging lock pin went. I discovered this when I had a huge struggle removing a pin that I had just installed; it had been cleaned up and greased and slid right in but I still had a helluva time getting it out a few minutes later; it was just as bad as the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i'm going to try the tool first, then if that does not work, the slide hammer with the M8x1.25 die threaded on the spindle pin nut. As this entire process was first needed to replace the lower control arm, I also am going to install softer springs. So do I dare do this entire thing again, and risk what Thegosttanker said above?
 

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Here's my experience... With the suspension out of the car, I made a puller and quickly ruined the threads on the spindle pin. Next, I grabbed a hammer and started pounding on one end of the pin, then the other. Oh, plenty of heat and penetrating oil were used with little to no success. Any way, the pin would move a mm one way, then I'd hammer it a mm the other way. Pretty soon I had mushroomed the ends of the spindle pin. No way it's sliding through the hole now... I cut the pins off flush with the control arm and started hammering away using a socket extension as a drift. Again, a mm one way, then the other, and so on. The whole process took about 6-8 hours, ruined a couple socket extensions, and I had a really sore arm for a couple days. Be sure you double check the orientation before you install your new pins, the slot for the lock bolt is not centered so the pin has to go in the correct way. I purchased some aftermarket locking pins but the shape was a little different. Luckily I kept the old pins so I could use them as a reference while I ground down the aftermarket pins with a grinder. Why didn't I use the original pins? Well, the 4 foot pounds (I think it was 4) that the FSM called for when tightening the lock pins actually broke the pin. It was not a fun day.
 

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I ended up dropping the whole thing and taking it to a friend's machine shop. We made a puller out of a cut off jack handle and hardened all thread, Washers and nuts.

Even then, we had to heat the joint red hot to get the pin out. I decided never again. That was back when these cars were cheap. I didn't really gain anything and if I had to pay the machine shop, I could have just replaced the entire unit.

You can service every part connected to the arms without pulling the pin. I don't know current prices but I would source the unit and fix anything on the unit that needs it.

The spindle pin wasn't worth the effort in my case. Your mileage may differ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So I have not removed the spindle pin YET, but there is great progress. I needed a break, for nurisment and liquid refreshment!!! As noted above I bought THE TOOL from Zcardepot. I had already buggered up the threads on the spindle using the big washers and turning the spindle nut....both sides( nuts are stripped out). So I knew to use the tool I needed good threads. I bought a M12x1.25 die (BTW, the size was incorrectly stated above....same size as a lug nut) and fixed up the threads. I also bought 3 nuts from my local Ace Hardware. After I fixed up the threads with the die, the coupling would not go on the spindle. Well, that is were the nuts were helpful, as I used these to futher clean up the buggered threads on the spindle. So first I attached the tool at the rear of the car to the spindle and started cranking, it helped to have a ratchet wrench (19MM). The spindle moved about 3-4 mm and then the wrench would not turn without gorrilla force. So I switched ends and started over. I now have moved the spindle about 2 inches, and I'm getting gitty with pleasure. BTW, inorder to lub up the spindle when it was in place, I need to plug the locking pin hole on the bottom. I found a rubber plug used on brake tubing and fittings which worked great. That allowed me to fill up the locking pin cavity with BP Blaster. I will report later with a picture.
Scott in CA
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
See the evidence......So I got it out......many thanks to the 19mm ratchet tool. Had to get garden gloves for both hands, lots of threads. Had to adjust the jack under the knuckle, as the spindle got bound up and wouldn't move.
All in all, a job well done, and the tool was a "god send."
 

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