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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, on my previous post I mentioned that anti freeze was leaking...Well...It juts got worst :eek:/ While driving it to see what's going on I realized that my temperature started increasing past the midway point. So I tried getting it back home, it just kept increasing and eventually I just pulled the bad boy over and the overflow tank was steaming and fluid was wrestling around in there. ..Like I recently posted...I just replaced the water pump (Before I replaced the waterpump the upper radiator hose wasn't even receiving fluid...Now that I changed it, there is fluid running through there). I have no clue what's going on, there's a screeching sound so I assume my belts aren't on tight enough. Could an untightened belt cause this? Or is it my radiator cap?
 

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Oopsy - does the belt squeal all of the time?

If you didn't tighten the waterpump/alternator belt sufficiently (and it takes some patience to get it right even if you've done it before) then the belt that turns your waterpump and alternator could literally be slipping off of those pulleys and hardly turning them at all. If this is the case your Voltage guage should be showing lower then normal numbers as well. It is critical that you keep the waterpump pushing the coolant through the system in a continuous loop.

It would explain your overheating issue and belt squealing symptom. It makes perfect sense that this is showing up now, immediately after you changed the waterpump.

If that is the case you need to spend some time using the "adjustment nut" underneath and to the right of the alternator (on my non-turbo when facing engine) to tighten the belt up until there is only a 1/4" of freeplay (hardly any at all). You'll have to loosen 3 bolts before you can begin adjustment (see your Haynes manual). The belt should stop squealing and the pulleys will turn allowing the to do there job.

Good luck!



Post Edited (Aug 19, 11:47am)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, so I went back out there and I tightened all of my belts, no more squeals! YAY! I then replaced my radiator cap thinking that was the problem...NOPE, I took it for a test drive taking it to all sorts of rpms (not past 4.5) to see how the readings would turn out....Everything seemed to be going fine but I guess the thermostat was stuck because AS SOON AS I hit the stop sign in my subdivision the temperature kicked up to almost 270 and I pulled in my driveway and heard that gurgling sound...Popped the hood and there goes the fluids wrestling in the reservoir...This is getting so frustrating...I'm going to take it to get a radiator flush because that's the one thing I haven't done yet aside from change the radiator ><

Any tips?
 

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Tip: Do the radiator flush yourself because it's hella easy!

Also, since that didn't solve your problem start at the top of this helpful list from AZ_ZBUM and work your way down. It's gotta be one of these things and I can't say it any better!

http://www.az-zbum.com/repair.overheat.shtml

Seriously though - don't pay someone good money to flush your radiator - it's easy! Check your Haynes manual for a step-by-step.



Post Edited (Aug 19, 2:22pm)
 

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Check the small hose from the radiator to the overflow tank. Mine did the same thing years ago and I found that it somehow had gotten a kink in it preventing the flow of the radiator fluid. Straightened it out and the problem was gone. Good luck.
 

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If you have questions about coolant loss, you need to do the following:

* Check your rad cap for leaks. Replace it?

* Check the gasket UNDER the thing that the cap fits onto...the brass part.

* Check the condition of the small brass pipe (on the brass thing) that connects to the hose going to your coolant overflow tank...it can corrode seriously. I soldered a soft copper tube over mine and reconnected the rubber hose.

* Be sure the hose to the coolant tank isn't blocked and also check the inlet in the bottom of the tank...this can happen if stop leak has been used. Remove the tank and clean it & the hose out with water pressure.

* When done....use a permanent marker to mark your COLD COOLANT LEVEL when the car has sat overnight, so you can keep close track of any coolant loss cold....before starting it up.

* If you rule out coolant loss from the cap to the coolant tank, then you can tell if there is a loss elsewhere...and you will have an accurate idea of HOW MUCH COOLANT YOU ARE LOSING.

* You can use a flashlight to check for leaks around the waterpump, and top front of engine, & back between the valve covers. Also check heater hoses and radiator hoses and the radiator. Best bet is to do this just as the engine temp first gets near the center area on the temp gauge, when it's not so hot that the coolant totally vaporizes...you can still see small leaks. A flashlight allows you to concentrate on a small area.

* Symptoms of a blown head gasket: Start car cold with cap off and coolant visible...look for a stream of bubbles...if you see any, this is probably an exhaust into coolant leak. If you get serious bubbling in the resevoir when the car is hot and it overheats, this pretty much confirms it. I would replace the thermostat first & "burp" it, before removing the heads though.
 
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