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How much fluid do I need to buy to do a complete flush?

Also, what are your thoughts on silicone fluid?
 

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When I rebuilt my calipers it took half of a larger bottle (forgot the ounces), but it shouldn't take more then one of the larger bottles. Check the owners manual for brake fluid capacity.
 

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When i flushed my system out it took a good two bottles total untill it was coming out clear from all four corners.

Also i don't recommend using DOT 5 because it very different from DOT 4. DOT 5 is hydrophobic while DOT 4 is hydrophillic. What this means is that if you get some water into your break system (happens all the time from the air) DOT 4 will mix well with the water and the boiling point will lowe some. with DOT 5 it does not mix with the water so you get water pockets in your break fluid. worse yet water is heavier so the watter pools in the calipers and you get break fluid that boils VERY fast because its just water. so unless you want to flush your break system every few months its not a good idea to use DOT 5. Becides it only makes a difference if you are currently boiling DOT 4 with what ever your doing in your car.
 

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You'll need 1.5 liters or 3 pints for a complete flush.

Stay away from silicone based fluids. They are NOT for performance use. Silicone wont absorb moisture over time. This may seem like a good thing, but what ends up happening is this. Water still condenses in the lines. The water doesn't mix with the fluid, so the result is the water will settle into the lowest part of your brake system. The lowest point in the system is typically the calipers. Once you heat up the calipers, the water (which has a much lower boiling point then the brake fluid) will turn to steam and viola... Major brake fade.

If you're looking for a good brake fluid then I'd recommend one of two. Either the Motul BPF600 which has a dry boiling point of 594 degrees Fahrenheit or ATE Super Blue Racing fluid with a dry boiling point of 536 degrees Fahrenheit .
The Motul BPF is one of the highest boiling point brake fluids you can buy short of the $64 a liter Castrol Racing fluid. The only down side is that it will absorb water pretty easily and should be replaced every year.

The ATE fluid comes in two colors (Blue and Yellow) The yellow is called ATE TYP 200 brake fluid. It is the same fluid as the blue, but in a yellow color. The two colors allow you to bleed the system and know exactly when one fluid is completely replaced with the other. Most guys the use the ATE will alternate between the two during changes. Another plus side to the ATE is that it doesn't absorb water as quickly, so is some what better for long term use.
 

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I found bleeding the brake system easier than the clutch system. I think I went through two small/medium sized bottles but I like to overdo it a bit.
 

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no, that just means it exceeds the minimums of both of those specs. I use the Valvoline Synthetic and am quite pleased with it. I bought two quarts of it, and it took about about 1.25 quarts to do my brakes. While you're right there, you might consider doing your clutch as well. That left me with about a pint left over for topping it off after time.
 

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If you plan on running the brakes hard, then don't cheap out on the fluid. I've boiled the Valvoline Synthetic within the 1st 20 minutes on a lapping day. The fluid is the single most important part of a good HP braking system. No matter how good your brakes are they mean squat if you've boiled your brake fluid. With a 500+HP car I wouldn't dick around about $21 worth of brake fluid.
 
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