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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I posted a few weeks back about my Z-car not revving above 3k under load, and not going over 4k with slow acceleration.

Well i unpluged the ECU...checked the wires for any breaks, made sure the connectors were good. And plugged it back in ( note: i did not clean anything, i just un plugged, plugged in ) And when i did that...TADA fixed.


????? any ideas??


1982 280zx Turbo

Matt
 

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Yah sometimes those connectors over the years can get the most minor amount of garbage ie. dust, dirt or water in them and they just need to be broken up a little. My 81 celica wouldn't start so I took the connector off and wiped it off with my fingers put it back on and it was fine.
 

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Here is the cure...

Yes, I have done the same thing many times; but the problem returns in a few days or weeks. The soldered connections on the P.C. board in the ECU are 20 years old. Unpluging and re-pluging them wiggles it and it makes a good connection again, for a while... The real fix is to re-solder those connections. Pull the cover off the ECU and solder the connectors. This can be done without removing the boards inside. I fought this problem for three years before I found it. Good luck.
 

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Another use for die-electric grease.

Clean the connector and the ECU pins with Break Parts Cleaner spray.

Spray the harness conector with WD-40. (the WD stands for Water Displacement)

Put Silicone die-electric Grease on the harness connector.

It should be good for another 20 years.

Wayne Monteath
Masham, Quebec.

NOTE. ALWAYS disconnect the negative battery terminal when you are messing with the ECU.
 

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Re: Another use for die-electric grease.

This is a common misconception about dielectric grease. Dielectric grease is an insulator (that's the definition of 'dielectric') and is intended to lubricate rubber parts like spark plug wire boots, not electrical connections. It shouldn't be used on connector contacts or they will eventually fail, and may overheat. An old electricians trick for cleaning contacts is to rub them with a pencil eraser. It removes the thin film of oxidation that forms over time, and also tends to remove surface oils. Just don't rub so hard that you wear through the plating on the contacts, especially gold-plated contacts.
 
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