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Discussion Starter #1
I won the battle with the Z beast -- got that very stubborn crank seal out! Just in case someone else has this issue - this is what I did:

Dimpled the top of the seal in a few places - 11, 12, 1 and 2 o'clock positions (file photo of intake cam seal - using pix for reference only)


Sprayed some lubricant into the dimples to help lube everything up, then used this handy little tool to pull it out:


Bought pick tool in Home Depot - cut the tip down to 1/8 in length (note tip is cut on an angle so end is formed as a barb). Inserted tool into center of seal and twisted end up so it pulled the seal's outer metal ring. Had to do this in two places - 10:30 and 1:30 o'clock positions to get it worked loose.

Outer side of seal seemed to be heat fused to the oil pump housing - that was the main reason it was so hard to work loose. Anyway it's done, no scratches to anything --- ALL IS GOOD FOR THE NIGHT!

Appreciate all the advice rec'd from my earlier posting on this.



Post Edited (Jan 24, 7:28pm)
 

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question? I am no mechanic and never worked on an engine. Is this the end of the crank that the flywheel connects to? Do you just slip a new seal in there when you remove the old one?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No - that's the end that connects to the tranny. The rear crank seal can only be accessed by removing the exhaust system and dropping the transmission. Both crank shaft ends do have a seal tho - the ones I'm replacing are all located behind the radiator fan blade.

That part of the Z has 5 seals -- 4 for the intake/exhaust CAMs and one way down low called the front crank seal. It is located directly behind the belt pulley at bottom of engine bay -- pulley that has a mark used to check the engine's timing.

Seal is just a ring gasket where a rotating shaft sits in the middle hole. In theory you just pop out the old one and slip the new one in. In practice - getting the old one out without scratching the center shaft or the outer metal fitting is the key (see 1st picture above) -- and these seals have been in-place for 15 yrs or so. New seal has to be pressed into place evenly - usually done with a piece of plastic pipe with flanges (ears) to keep the seal from getting pressed in any lower than the metal surround the holds it.

Does this help explain it?



Post Edited (Jan 25, 7:12pm)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yep - seems like this issue varies from car to car. Altho mine seems to be about average for most issues and repair difficulties.
 
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