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Brakes stop your wheels, but tires stop your car. If you are driving a higher performance type of vehicle you should have good high performance tires. With tires you get what you pay for-price reflects quality. What quality you need is the real question. I personally run H rated Mich MXV4s on my car because they are among the best for performance, balancing and durability. They ran about 113 each before labor. I got lucky and paid a lot less. Most tire manufacturers make high and low quality products. I feel Michelin doesn't, they own BFG and Uniroyal for that (they each make high and low quality stuff). If you can afford it, always buy name brand tires like Bridge, Mich, Yoke, Goodwhatever, etc. Now, obviously, if you just bum around town you don't need high dollar/quality tires. Judge for yourself. But major name brand tires always possess higher quality characteristics than the house brands(Viper, Patriot, Douglas, Mastercraft, Futura) Most tire stores offer house brand tires made by name brands, but will usually say it on the side. If it doesn't say so on the tire, the manufacturer doesn't want to claim it. Always buy A traction tires as this is the straight line, wet weather braking grade your tire has been given on a scale of ABC. Don't ever buy anything else. It could be a low A as the scale is broad. If your cars requires an H-rated tire, anything less will give less than optimum results as the car will not handle in turns and braking as it should--heat will build also and the tire will be compromised.
While I'm on the subject, when tire stores spin balance tires, there are several settings on the balancer that give varying results of balance. Static balance is weights on one side of the rim only-looks good, but crappy results. Dynamic is weights on both sides of the wheel-good results. Tire guys are gonna hate me for this but if your are real picky about a tire shaking a little you need this info. There are two settings on computer balancers and no other balancer can give as good a result. There is a general type setting that rounds the required weight needed to the nearest .25 oz and a specific reading that gives you the exact weight needed to balance the assembly-best results. You really can't feel the difference if your tire is out only .25 oz, you really can't. But if it is higher and the machine is rounding down, you can feel it. If you run at higher speeds (above 65) you will definately notice a general balance job that is far off. I personally don't care about a little shake as I sometimes run up to 100 or more for short periods and just tolerate some of it. Don't be picky if your not already and if you go back to the tire store more than a couple of times they are going to tell you to screw off so don't bug them too much. And don't expect the cheaper tires to balance and give good quality performance because they will not. A good tire store employee can give good insight to a tire, but a bad one can give you a line of crap. The installers that have been there a while will know which tires are better than others. If you want to know the truth about a tire ask a couple of installers at that store without the salesman knowing about it. They don't want you to come back and have your tire problems become their problems when they shake or don't handle worth a crap. Good luck and be safe.
 
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