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Alternatively, if you have an extra one you'd be willing to sell, let me know. It seems like mine is broken but I'm still doing a bit of troubleshooting and cleaning.
The Bosch one I've been linked before is a bit expensive and I'm wondering if there are other options (Fuel Injection Auxiliary Valve-Auxiliary Air Valve Bosch 0-280-140-124 for sale online | eBay)
http://www.atlanticz.ca/zclub/techtips/aar/index.html

scroll down to the bottom of the page and it talks about the cressida air regulator you can use instead
 

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If yours is serviceable Fuel Injection Corporation will R&R it.
 

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Since this is basically a Bosch L Jetronic system - very similar to the system that came on many European cars in the '80s/90s - you can find AARs on Volvos and Beemers of that vintage. AARs in my experience are notorious for not closing all the way. I went down to the local Pick Your Part on half-price day and grabbed a half dozen of them from mostly Volvos for, as I remember, $2-3 each. Got 'em home, wired each one and watched to see closure. Only one closed all the way. Identical to the dead one in the Z, so it bolted right in. FWIW, you don't need these once the car warms up. I've blocked them off with no detrimental affect except slightly longer warm-up time in cold weather.
 

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my '81 turbo air regulator has a coolant in and out connection, in addition to the electrical one. very hard to start in cold weather; stumbling and missing until warmed.
 

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Coolant does run through that part. The Burkey Vision YouTube channel goes in depth on the part and its purpose. I can't remember all the details on it, and he explains it far better than I could ever hope to.
 

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Well, technically speaking, the coolant flows through a small, rectangular alloy tank, upon which the valve is mounted.

Convection passes heat from the tank to the alloy foot of the body, providing on-going extra heat to the bi-metal piece. I've never tested to see if the electric heater current is stopped at some point.
 

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Well, technically speaking, the coolant flows through a small, rectangular alloy tank, upon which the valve is mounted.

Convection passes heat from the tank to the alloy foot of the body, providing on-going extra heat to the bi-metal piece. I've never tested to see if the electric heater current is stopped at some point.
there is a dedicated coolant line running from just below #1 spark plug (tapped off one of the heater core lines), around the front of the block, to the air regulator, and back in just beside the tps. the '81 turbo is unique like this. from what i've gleaned, anyway.
 
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