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Discussion Starter #1
I’m just about ready to get my car running but I realized I wasn’t getting any spark. I started testing from the plugs back and I found that I wasn’t getting any power from the coil. Before replacing it I tested to see if the coil was getting power and it was showing as positive on both the pos and neg posts. After replacing it I still have the same problem. Any ideas?
 

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I’m just about ready to get my car running but I realized I wasn’t getting any spark. I started testing from the plugs back and I found that I wasn’t getting any power from the coil. Before replacing it I tested to see if the coil was getting power and it was showing as positive on both the pos and neg posts. After replacing it I still have the same problem. Any ideas?
Check the condenser and condenser wires. If those arent working the coil won't fire.
 

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What?? The condenser is just there to attenuate (help eliminate) electrical noise. Coil will fire with or without it if everything else is correct.

OP - the coil, well, is a "coil" - it's just coiled up wires. You'll read voltage on both terminals - because it's just coiled up wires. The coil "gives off a spark" when the "-" terminal is grounded momentarily. In a points distributor, the points do the sporadic grounding. Or it can be done by an "electronic ignition module" which is the case in your ZX. There is a common point of failure in the ZX electronic ignition distributor - search, you'll find it. Ya, download the Factory Service Manual too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So if I crank the engine over then the ground should stop reading positive? And if this isn’t the case then it would be a crank angle sensor, right?
 

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So if I crank the engine over then the ground should stop reading positive? And if this isn’t the case then it would be a crank angle sensor, right?
Only for the millisecond the controller is applying a ground to get it to spark. That happens very quickly and probably can't be read with a multimeter. Google "how do I test an ignition coil?" (It's not your coil)

Do you have an N/A ZX or a turbo? Big difference in what controls spark...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So if I crank the engine over then the ground should stop reading positive? And if this isn’t the case then it would be a crank angle sensor, right?
Only for the millisecond the controller is applying a ground to get it to spark. That happens very quickly and probably can't be read with a multimeter. Google "how do I test an ignition coil?" (It's not your coil)

Do you have an N/A ZX or a turbo? Big difference in what controls spark...
It’s a turbo, pretty sure it’s electronic “points” in the distributor
 

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OMG... You should have said that from the beginning. The L28ET is the first in a Nissan to use ECCS and it's the modern scheme of using the ECU to control spark. The turbo distributor contains the C.A.S. - it's an optical module that gives the ECU a crank and cam position signal. The ECU puts out a "spark now" signal which is converted by the Ignitor ((Electronic Ignition Module) mounted on the side of the coil bracket) to a value that will fire the coil.

Get the FSM and go through the troubleshooting steps in the ECCS section.

An easy test to check the CAS is: expose the ECU so you can see the LED through the hole in the side of the case. Turn the ignition to ON, LED should light. Crank the engine. The LED should turn OFF once the ECU sees a CAS signal. If you've cranked for a while and the LED doesn't turn off, it's the CAS or it's wiring or it's connection to the ECU. If it does turn off, your problem is ECU, Ignitor, or (probably not) coil OR the wiring or connectors to any of the above. 90% of problems I see in EFI and ECCS Z's is wiring and/or connector related. The connectors are not weatherproof and these cars were never meant to be on the road this long. The wire is oxidized and the connectors are corroded. Neither is good for an EFI (ECCS) system...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OMG... You should have said that from the beginning. The L28ET is the first in a Nissan to use ECCS and it's the modern scheme of using the ECU to control spark. The turbo distributor contains the C.A.S. - it's an optical module that gives the ECU a crank and cam position signal. The ECU puts out a "spark now" signal which is converted by the Ignitor ((Electronic Ignition Module) mounted on the side of the coil bracket) to a value that will fire the coil.

Get the FSM and go through the troubleshooting steps in the ECCS section.

An easy test to check the CAS is: expose the ECU so you can see the LED through the hole in the side of the case. Turn the ignition to ON, LED should light. Crank the engine. The LED should turn OFF once the ECU sees a CAS signal. If you've cranked for a while and the LED doesn't turn off, it's the CAS or it's wiring or it's connection to the ECU. If it does turn off, your problem is ECU, Ignitor, or (probably not) coil OR the wiring or connectors to any of the above. 90% of problems I see in EFI and ECCS Z's is wiring and/or connector related. The connectors are not weatherproof and these cars were never meant to be on the road this long. The wire is oxidized and the connectors are corroded. Neither is good for an EFI (ECCS) system...
My bad, thought I put it on here. But thanks man, I’ll go check it out tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Tried the ECU trick like cgsheen said but I can’t find any type of LED. This is not the factory ECU, I’m pretty sure it’s a reman but it’s from Godzilla Raceworks. I have a Hanes manual but I’ve trie just about everything in there and can’t figure it out.
 

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Posting pictures would help.
 
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